Anacostia Watershed Blog

New Volunteer Program Manager

Hello! My name is Joanna Fisher and I’m the new Volunteer Program Manager here at the Anacostia Watershed Society. I joined the team in late July when I had the opportunity to work alongside our departing Volunteer Coordinator Ann DeSanctis. Ann has made tremendous contributions to AWS and we’re all very excited for her next endeavor at graduate school. Ann and I have organized lots of exciting volunteer opportunities in the coming weeks, make sure to check out our calendar to learn more!

A Timely Visit from Bay Executive Council

By Dan Smith & Lori Baranoff

Bald eagle soars over Anacostia River
Anacostia River

July 24 -- This week the Chesapeake Bay Executive Council – governors, the D.C. mayor, federal agency heads – convened for their annual meeting, this time at the National Arboretum on the Anacostia River. Their “big picture” focus on meeting major milestones necessary for a clean Bay by 2025 kept them from the river just down the hill -- where they may have glimpsed a bald eagle plucking a fish or a rower taking a lunch time canoe break on a gorgeous summer day. Those are river experiences we love to share and that show why this effort is so important.

Submerged Aquatic Vegetation, The River’s Health Barometer

By: Audrey Pleva


Wild Celery underwater in the Susquehanna River. Credit: Debbie Hinkle, Chesapeake Quarterly

AWS is now moving underwater and beginning an exciting effort to restore the river’s submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV).  These beautiful grasses are essential to cleaning the river and providing oxygen to our suffocating fish and other aquatic organisms.

2015 Earth Day Cleanup Results

Earth Day 2015 Results Page 2

Thousands Turn Out To Clean the Anacostia River, Celebrate Heroes

Anacostia Watershed Society Hosts Largest and Most Successful Earth Day Clean Up on the Anacostia River

Volunteers at Earth Day 2015Bladensburg, MD, April 27, 2015 – More than 2600 local residents and dozens of corporate partners came out Saturday April 25th to participate in the Anacostia Watershed Society’s Earth Day Clean Up and Celebration.

Ban the Foam, Prince George's County!

Plastic foam containers from our Nash Run trash trap
Plastic foam containers collected at our trash trap in Nash Run, a stream of the Anacostia River.

Earth Day 2015 Site Sketches: Wells Run Stream Buffer

Site Leader:  Mary Abe
Email: mabe@anacostiaws.org
Phone Number: 301-699-6204 x106
Site Capacity: 50

Wells Run is a tributary of the Anacostia that has seen a lot of improvement in recent years, and the community is dedicated to keep making the stream healthier! 



Wells Run runs through both the Riverdale Park and University Park communities before connecting to the NE branch of the Anacostia River.  Compared to many tributaries of the Anacostia Wells Run is relatively trash free, but suffers from a lack of stream buffer vegetation, and in many areas the slopes leading to the stream bank are mowed grass.


Maryland Legislature Bolsters Efforts to Reduce Pollution

Responds to charges of taxing the rain


By Dan Smith & Lori Baranoff

Polluted stormwater runoff from streetChallenged for much of the past year for requiring the state’s largest jurisdictions to set fees for local polluted runoff reduction projects, the Maryland General Assembly took action this week to give local jurisdictions flexibility in how they raise these important pollution-reduction funds. The Assembly also affirmed requirements that the work get done. The bill now goes to Gov. Larry Hogan for signing.

Support Prince George's County Action on Toxics and Trash


Volunteers scooping up plastic containers at our Earth Day Cleanup
Bladensburg Waterfront Park, MD.

Earth Day 2015 Site Sketches: Quincy Run

Site Leader: Marian Dombrowski
Contact Info: mdombros@gmail.com
Cell: 301-775-1191
Site Capacity: 200

Quincy Run is a tributary that is near and dear to the AWS staff not only for its literal closeness to our offices but because it, like many other tributaries of the Anacostia, has quite the geography and history that works for/against it.

Quincy Run begins near MD 202 and the Baltimore/Washington Parkway and runs above ground* for just over a half mile.  It begins in neighborhoods but quickly changes over to a large wooded site that receives a lot of trash due to dumping and blowing trash from people littering the roadways and businesses around the area.

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