Yours – Mine – Our Stormwater

By Margie Noonan and Ashley Parker

Tap. Tap. Tap. Tip-tap. Tip-tap tip-tap tip-tap…

Don’t you love those spring mornings when you get up and hear the soft rain pattering down onto the ground, watering all of the flowers and plants that are budding after a cold winter?  That sweet smell of the earth waking back up.  Looking out your window and watching ephemeral streams meander across the ground.  As a child, I used to love splashing in puddles and racing leaves down the asphalt rapids.

Moving Right Along at Briers Mill Run

By Margie Noonan and Ashley Parker

 

You may remember our most recent DNR blog post from December in which we reported on our stream cleanup with GEMS students from William Wirt Middle School, in Riverdale, MD. While winter has slowed down our outdoor restoration efforts, our staff has been hard at work coordinating with engineers and local community members on the process for rebuilding Briers Mill Run and two of its outfalls that have become a danger to the community.  The Anacostia Watershed Society selected KCI Technologies to come up with a design that will stabilize the erosion occurring around the outfalls and improve the Briers Mill Run riparian corridor behind William Wirt.

 

AWS Partners with GEMS to Clean Briers Mill Run

By Ashley Parker and Alecia Donaldson

Goats to the Rescue!

By Ashley Stanton and Chris Myers

The AWS Community Stormwater Improvement Project

By: Ashley Stanton, Restoration Project Manager

Stormwater Utility Fee= Watershed Protection and Restoration

By: Jim Foster, President

Recently AWS received our bill from Prince George's County DER for our stormwater fee.  At first we weren't sure what it was.  But quickly we found the fantastic brochure in the envelope that explained in simple terms what this fee is about.  I like the brochure so much, I scanned it and sent to my board with the comment "pinch me"!  Of course we immediately and proudly paid the bill. This money will be used to restore our waterways by installing natural features to control rainfall.

Stormwater pollution case in Virginia misses the point

A recent Clean Water Act case in northern Virginia has been capturing attention because it deals with the regulation of stormwater pollution. The case, Virginia Department of Transportation versus Environmental Protection Agency (PDF), is broken down nicely by AWS colleague Jon Devine of the Natural Resources Defense Council on their Switchboard blog:

At its core, the decision said that the Environmental Protection Agency couldn’t use stormwater volume as a proxy for sediment pollution when developing a cleanup target (known in Clean Water Act jargon as a “total maximum daily load” or “TMDL”) for Accotink Creek, a tributary to the Potomac River.

Sustainable SITES Project at the GW House

By Alex Galbreath, AWS Fall Stewardship Intern

AWS is in the process of constructing a bioretention area and installing permeable pavement at its headquarters, the George Washington House. The project is part of the Sustainable Sites Initiative, an interdisciplinary effort by the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas at Austin, and the United States Botanic Garden to create voluntary national guidelines and performance benchmarks for sustainable land design, construction and maintenance practices. The aim of the project here at the GW house is to reduce runoff and erosion while capturing rainwater for irrigation purposes.

Hurricane Sandy's Impact on the Anacostia Watershed


View of the Anacostia River under the South Capitol St Bridge.

Stormwater Management and Climate Change

By Michael Schramm, Stewardship Intern

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) suggests that it is likely that a current 1-in-20-year annual maximum daily precipitation amount will become a 1-in-5 to a 1-in-15-year event by the end of the 21st century. The Mid-Atlantic region is anticipated to face less frequent but more intense precipitation events as a result of increased air temperatures, which in turn increase the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. We can expect longer dry periods, with more intense and extreme rainfall between those dry periods by the end of this century.

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